Ohio Kratom Laws


Ohio Kratom Laws

By Triumph Kratom   |   October 22, 2019

Kratom Laws in Ohio

Kratom, or mitragnya speciosa, is experiencing a rise in popularity among the American public. This natural product has gained recognition due to the testimonials of those who’ve used it for self-treatment of various ailments that they may suffer from and as an alternative to conventional pharmaceutical remedies they’ve been prescribed.

The United States government has had a significant degree of skepticism when it comes to kratom, citing adverse effects among those who engaged in usage of kratom dating back to 2014. But there have been more who want to further analyze the potential benefits of kratom, and to that end state and local governments have begun their own research and legislative work into it with Ohio being one of the more visible states conducting this process.


Kratom’s Rise In Ohio


For Ohio residents, kratom’s visibility was heightened within the past few years since the Southeast Asian herb became available for purchase online. There were those who took advantage of this to help with certain personal wellness issues including opioid addiction. This kind of procurement method led to many other places of business making it available to purchase kratom, which included convenience stores, bars, health food stores and gas stations.

With this expansion of availability came reports from law enforcement officials of those having hallucinations, seizures and even some isolated fatalities. These situations compelled the State of Ohio Board Of Pharmacy in November 2018 to call for the classification of kratom as a Schedule I drug, putting it in the same class of narcotics as heroin. Their reasoning for this lies in their assertion that two of the main components of kratom, mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine cause it to be an addictive and possibly harmful product for users.

They also point to six cases that occurred in 2016 and 2017 that listed kratom usage as a cause of death according to the death certificates. Clearly, Ohio has paid more attention to the safety of kratom than many other states in the nation. 


Kratom’s Legality and Future In Ohio


The Ohio Board of Pharmacy did allow for a few public comment periods late last year, and reportedly received up to 6,000 comments during those times from those in support of kratom. This sparked more debate and has compelled medical groups and experts to do more research into the usage of kratom on behalf of the board with an eye towards discerning how buyers would be able to receive the unadulterated product without any regulation.

Another concern that the board expressed during this time stems from the fact that there are instances where residents have combined kratom products with other substances. While the research remains to be done exhaustively, it is thought that many of the instances of adverse effects stem from combination use.

The board made the recommendation to ban kratom and label it as a Schedule I Controlled Substance in March 2019. The proposal was then sent to Governor Mike DeWine’s office along with the state legislature’s Joint Committee on Agency Rule Review to see if the proposal can be made by the board with authority.

Once again, a heavy amount of public commentary and testimonials were entered into record, and the Ohio Board of Pharmacy has delayed a final decision until September 2019. Currently, kratom is still available for purchase in the state of Ohio pending the final word on this process of legislation.

For more information on kratom laws across the country, check out our Kratom Legality Map

 

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Adminstration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. 




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